Cortinarius (Cortinarius) rubellus

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Cortinarius (Cortinarius) rubellus

RBG Kew herbarium accession number K(M)159389. 23 August 2008 Hampshire. Photograph copyright Leif Goodwin

Synonyms

Cortinarius speciosissimus, Cortinarius orellanoides

Cap

Conical, usually with a narrow umbo, expanding with age, velvety, orange brown, about 2 to 8cm across

Gills

Broad, distant, adnate, pale ochre brown then rust brown

Stem

Equal or slightly club shaped, banded, pale orange brown, to about 1.5cm across by 12cm high

Flesh

Pale yellow-orange, firm

Smell

Faint to strong, of radish

Taste

Do not taste

Season

Autumn

Distribution

Rare, most UK collections are from Scotland

Habitat

With Pine, favouring Pinus sylvestris, but also with Bilberry, Vaccinium myrtillus

Spore Print

Rust

Microscopic Features

Spores ellipsoidal, rough-warty (9-12) x (6.5-8.5) µm2

Edibility

Deadly poisonous. The principle cause of death is kidney failure, though liver failure and neurological symptoms have also been reported. Unfortunately the toxins are not destroyed by either cooking or drying. Somewhat surprisingly there is evidence that women are much less susceptible to the toxins than are men.

Notes

The collection in the photographs was growing with Beech and Bilberry

Additional Photographs

Cortinarius (Cortinarius) rubellus

23 August 2008 Hampshire. Photograph copyright Leif Goodwin

Cortinarius (Cortinarius) rubellus

23 August 2008 Hampshire. Photograph copyright Leif Goodwin

Cortinarius (Cortinarius) rubellus

23 August 2008 Hampshire. Photograph copyright Leif Goodwin